Will ‘Melton Mowbray’ stay protected in the EU after the Brexit transition?

The UK has agreed to keep EU names protected, but what about UK names in the EU?

By Peter Ungphakorn
POSTED AUGUST 29, 2020 | UPDATED JANUARY 10, 2021

News that Britain wanted to renegotiate a deal struck in the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement on geographical indications — names such as Scotch whisky, Melton Mowbray pies, Cognac and Roquefort cheese — has triggered a discussion about what exactly was agreed, what wasn’t included and why not.

A report in The Guardian (echoing some earler reports) said the EU was “flabbergasted” that the UK wanted to water down the deal on geographical indications. “It’s just not going to happen,” the report quoted an EU official as saying.

Continue reading “Will ‘Melton Mowbray’ stay protected in the EU after the Brexit transition?”

What are geographical indications? What do they mean for post-Brexit UK?

People’s views of geographical indications range from cherishing them as precious cultural heritage and commercial property, to annoyance and scorn. They are complicated. Every argument has a counter-argument

“How was your Cornish pasty sir? And your lamb, madam? It was New Zealand lamb. Excellent. Would you like some dessert? A cheese plate? We have a new Tiroler Bergkäse from Austria. I also recommend a fine French or Swiss Gruyère. And we have a lovely Caerphilly. Or our chef’s favourite mature Cheddar. A selection? Of course. And to go with that? Would you like to stay with your Amarone della Valpolicella? An Armagnac? A perfect choice. And sir? More Evian. Coming right up.”
Which of these are geographical indications? Answer at the end (click the image to see it full size)

By Peter Ungphakorn
POSTED MAY 5, 2018 | FIRST PUBLISHED ON UK TRADE FORUM APRIL 3, 2018 | UPDATED JANUARY 10, 2021

JUMP TO
PART 1 BASICS
What are geographical indications (GIs)?
What do they apply to?
Are they always place names?
How do they relate to rules of origin?
Why protect them?
What does protection mean?
How much protection?

PART 2 POLICY
How are geographical indications protected?
What does the UK face with the EU?
What do we know about the UK’s plans?
What does the UK face with other countries?
What does the UK face in the WTO?
Some GI titbits — style/method, orange, champagne, gruyère, feta

PART 3 WHAT THE WAITRESS SAID

Among the thousands of policy questions facing Britain after it leaves the EU is what its approach should be for geographical indications.

These are names — like Melton Mowbray pork pies, Rutland bitter and Bordeaux wine — that are used to identify certain products.

The UK’s policy will affect both its own and other countries’ names, and it has now taken first steps in revealing what its approach will be.

People’s views of geographical indications range from cherishing them as precious cultural heritage and commercial property, to annoyance and scorn.

What are they? And what are the decisions facing the UK? This is an attempt to explain them simply. It’s in two main parts with a small third part tacked on.

Continue reading “What are geographical indications? What do they mean for post-Brexit UK?”